6 Ways to Use Technology to Boost Student Performance

stumbled across a book titled, “Differentiating Instruction with Technology in K-5 Classrooms” by Grace E. Smith and Stephanie Throne, which was published from ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education). After doing more research, I found that Grace and Stephanie are both Educational Technologists and researchers who are dedicated to find best practices for teachers. Through their work, they also discovered a variety of other research in educational tech, which they brought forward in their book as well.

I created the image above based on the information from Grace and Stephanie, which they obtained through CARET (Center of Applied Research in Educational Technology); CARET was founded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is a project through ISTE.

6 Ways to Use Technology to Boost Student Performance:

  1. Use technology in a way that “directly supports curriculum objectives.”
  2. Use technology to “foster student collaboration.”
  3. Find and use applications that “adapt to student knowledge and experience, while giving feedback to student and teachers.”
  4. Integrate technology into the “typical instructional day.”
  5. Use technology to give students opportunities to “design and implement projects that tie with curriculum.”
  6. Build a community where students, parents, teachers, and administration “support technology usage.”

I found these 6 points to be compelling and relatable to all I do as an educator. If you take away the word “technology” in any of the above statements, you will find THE optimal learning environment in any classroom, with or without tech.

To illustrate, classrooms should always aim to support objectives, to be collaborative, give immediate feedback, while giving students opportunities to design their learning. Technology can help, but it is not the magic remedy in those equations. Yes, technology can boost student performance in these mentioned areas, but it cannot be done without the positive cultural infrastructure which supports those notions to begin with.

Furthermore, I believe technology is crucial, but I also understand it is not the “end-all-be-all.” Instead, the learning and the environment is what our underlying basis and principle should consist of. Technology can be a transformative asset when used with purpose- but if it is not taking the learning and connecting to the next level, we need to rethink how we are using the tools.

Reflections: During your technology integration journey- Remember that the most thrilling part of the learning expedition is not the technology. More importantly, enthusiasm is won by focusing on the DISCOVERY of learning new things and expanding your skill-set and passions, while inspiring the people you serve to do the same.

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How-to Guide for Starting Student Edcamps

Edcamps for teachers have taken the educational world by storm. Teachers, including myself, have been refreshed and renewed with the “edcamp style” of learning which consists of learning and sharing in an unconference format. In regular PD’s and conferences, you have to sit in one spot, even if you are not getting anything out of it. While, in edcamps, the rule of two feet allows you to move between sessions at your heart’s desire. You gain the opportunity to talk with other teachers and dive into learning organically.

After being apart of many edcamps across the nation, attending an edcamp leadership summit, and creating and co-leading a city-wide edcamp, I felt a stirring in my heart also to try it with students. I thought- If we know edcamps are beneficial for adults, isn’t worth a try to allow students to test them out as well? After all, giving students a voice and choice in their learning should be the compass in which we lead.

 

Click this picture to see the original tweet!

My lovely friends and 4th grade team at my school, Angie, Molly, and Lauren, were gracious and beyond willing to team-up with me to give this a try for the first time!

We learned an abundant amount throughout this process and through just diving in; We found out what worked, what did not work, and how we would build upon our foundation next time. I hope you find these tips below beneficial and encouraging to start a student edcamp at YOUR school:

*Disclaimer: At the end of the day, do what is best for YOUR kids. Feel free to use and takeaway whatever you love from this post and to transform it for your kids! What works for our 4th graders, may not work for your kids, and that is okay.

1. Stay focused on the learning

The edcamp model at its whole should be straightforward and focused on the learning. Period. Do not worry about there being prizes or treats. Keep your vision on the learning, student passions, and incorporating students into the process as much as possible.

2. Collaborate with others before jumping in

Want your own copy of this board to edit? Click the picture.
  • Meet and collaborate with your colleagues online and in person at least a couple times before the edcamp.
  • Create a skeleton outline of what you need to do, “before the edcamp,” “during the edcamp” and“after the edcamp.”
  • Determine the time, date, and how many sessions you will have, and how long you want your sessions to be.
  • Create a skeleton of a blank board (either digitally or on an anchor chart) for students to fill in at a later time.
  • THINK: Do you want students to bring devices to research, if needed or do you want them to be device-less to focus on the conversations?
    • We found some topics fit using technology better than others, while other sessions we learned needed materials/objects next time to make the session come to life.
  • Agree on rooms or spaces you have available and supervision for each space.
  • TIP:
    • For our 4th graders, we chose three sessions with 20 minutes per session, and 5-minute transitions to move to the next session and to reflect with peers on their learning. Looking back, next time we will stick with 15 minutes per session.

3. Prepare students before the edcamp

Students created the norms and agreed upon them.

Before the edcamp:

  • Teachers discussed with their students what a true “discussion” looked like, and they practiced in small groups.
  • Each class created norms on a padlet, and we discussed it as a group.
  • We showed this elementary edcamp example video to students as an exemplar.

4. Meet with students the day before the edcamp

Above is a snapshot of part of our Session 1 room ideas! Click picture to see Dotstorming webpage.
  • Meet with all participating teachers and students together.
  • Answer any questions students may have.
  • TIPS:
    • As a group, we determined that each session slot time slot would have its own TOPIC. For example, for session 1, students chose TECHNOLOGY.
    • After the session topic was set, students were then able to vote and agree upon different room ideas. The winners were: coding, ctrl shortcuts and tricks, google slides, and musically (See below for other session and room ideas!)
    • For this process, I would highly recommend using Dotstorming to give students the opportunity to write in their ideas and then to vote. For each separate session, I created a different Dotstorming link to make it easy to organize.
    • If access to devices is not available, have students brainstorm together and then vote by raising hands, tallying, or writing on a ballot.
Above is the finished product and the session topics that students created, voted, and agreed upon.

5. Day of the Edcamp

Create your own dropdown or check-off form like above.
  • If you want a more clear idea of who is going to what session, create a Google form with dropdown choices.
  • Send board sessions and any other needed items to students in Google Classroom to remind them of session times and locations.
  • Meet together in one big space before starting to go over norms and to get EXCITED!
  • Let go and LET KIDS LEAD.
    • This is hard, but important. 
    • Step back and do your best to let students own their conversations and learn without teacher interruptions.

6. After the Edcamp

Give students time to reflect

  • Discuss as a group how the edcamp went, their favorite parts, and how they want to change it next time.
  • Give students a Google Form to gather honest feedback to make the next edcamp even better (Click this link to view my sample form).
  • As a teacher team, go over the feedback.
  • Then, pat yourselves on the back for a job well-done!

Ever since we had the edcamp, kids have been asking us non-stop to do another edcamp again! I highly encourage you to attend edcamps yourself first before starting a student edcamp. But, once you are ready to start a student edcamp- just DIVE IN. You will not regret it, and your students will thank you for being brave enough to take the plunge!

Soon, I will be teaming up with my 3rd grade team to launch another student edcamp where we will invite high schoolers who are inspiring teachers to co-lead sessions. Stay tuned on Twitter!

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Goal-Setting Checklist

As the new year begins, everyone is excited, and rightfully so, to start the year on a new and fresh foot.

Losing weight, focusing on fitness, spending more time with family, or becoming more balanced are among the common objectives many of us set for ourselves. The hard thing is, once February hits, our willpower to reach our goals often diminishes into the daylight just as quickly as we set them. Trust me, I am guilty of this, too.

The truth is life gets in the way sometimes, and I am here to tell you that is okay. Side note: When life does happen, be kind to yourself.

But, here is what I have found from experience: When setting your goals, no matter what the occasion, it is beneficial to check yourself to see if the goals you are setting are even the goals you truly need the MOST.

Here are guiding questions that I have created and written down over the past three years. I read these often whenever I need a swift kick of remembrance of what matters when setting goals. Also, when teaching, I show these questions to my students as well, while sharing my goal-setting stories and struggles. After all, goal setting needs to go beyond academics.

-What goal will bring the most meaning to my life?

In education, we have “power standards” to choose from which will bring the biggest bang for your buck when teaching and learning; This same theory can be applied to setting goals. We all would love to improve ourselves in a variety of aspects of our lives, but Rome was not built in a day, and neither are strong, accomplished individuals. Ask yourself: What goal will bring the most meaning to my life? Then, go for it!

 

-Am I focusing on what matters?

This question is THE question that rattles me the most. Sometimes what I think matters the most to me in certain moments, is not what REALLY matters. It is easy to get caught up in the nuances of life- Almost too easy. If this question shakes you to your core as well, get a trusted outside opinion of your goals as you set them. I often ask Adam, my fiancee, his thoughts about the goals I set, so he can refocus me when I become cloudy.

 

-Am I setting the bar for myself too low?

If you set the bar low, you will hit it every single time. We often are more scared of achieving than we are of losing. Do not misinterpret this as setting completely unrealistic expectations. I believe that no dream is too big, but you have to pair that idea with real-life action steps.

 

-How will achieving my target help the well-being of others?

Goal-setting needs to move beyond “me” into “WE.” How is what you are aiming to achieve going to benefit others beyond yourself? Improving yourself is a beautiful thing, but if this improvement can also inspire others along the way, THEN you have created magic.

 

-Have I prepared mini-short-term steps and long-term steps to take along my journey?

As Tony Robbins says, people who are inventors create and design everything twice: Once in your imagination, and twice in reality.

Now, take this theory and transfer it to goal-setting. As you set goals, you are the inventor. But, it takes laying out the design, tenacity, and trial and error to find the right recipe for YOUR personal success. Always remember- What works for ____________(Insert name here), may not work for me.

 

-Am I trying to press the fast-forward button on my life without enjoying the present moment?

Life is short. Are we enjoying each beautiful moment giving to us? OR are we trying to wish ourselves OUT of the current moment we are living in to be catapulted into something better?

When I was a child, I spent most of my years trying too hard to grow up as fast as I could. Now, I look back and wish I could have told myself to JUST BE. Sometimes, that little girl inside me now still needs that reminder.

I hope this checklist of sorts helps you in some small way. Here’s to achieving all you were born to achieve and giving yourself grace when you fall.

I believe in you,

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What Are You Waiting For?

In some capacity, everyone is waiting for an area of their life to change.

As educators, we always want to improve in many sectors, but we often do not feel in the driver’s seat of teaching due to ever changing curriculum, standards, assessments, and more. These factors beyond the control of teachers lead them to feel stuck in a conundrum while thinking, “Where do I even begin when each day something else is the new best practice?”

So, we wait for someone to give us the magic professional development and recipe for success. With an expert’s opinion, we can then be sure that what we are doing is correct, right?

Wait…not so fast.

I am a words and book junkie. I value the art of connecting on a global scale and learning from experts each day. But, I also know that we as educators are professionals. We are good at what we do. We love our kids, and we work hard to do what is best for them each day. We build upon our practice consistently.

So, let us stop underestimating ourselves. Let’s stop waiting. Let us begin to trust who we are and our innate abilities.

Whatever that goal is that you have in mind, just go for it.

What do you want at your school?

Do you want to try a paperless classroom? Try it. Do you want to start makerspaces at your school? Do it.

Be your personal advocate and never look back.

We cannot wait on others. Each time we halt, we become a roadblock to each other and to the students we serve.

Be bold enough to try and be relentless enough to try it again and again.

The results will not always be picture perfect, but you can never improve if you are not courageous enough to take the first step.

 

Go forth and be awesome,

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Self-Care in the Digital Age

We are surrounded, and drowning, under a sea of devices to make our lives more efficient.

But, what people do not talk about is the lasting effects that excessive usage of technology can have on a person without proactive and swift decisions to have a healthy mind and body, from the inside-out. ISTE’s standards also recognize the how overuse of tech can impact one’s mental, physical, and emotional health and one’s digital identity.

Recently, I have been reading “Sleep Smarter” by Shawn Stevenson, and it is a game-changer. Great sleep is more than just aiming for 8 hours; What you do during the day will directly impact your sleep or lack thereof.

In the digital world that we live in, we must actively be leading kids and ourselves to practice self-care.

I have been doing research on how extensive use of digital screens causes eye fatigue and strain while interfering with your sleep and circadian rhythms. Only decreasing the brightness of your screen will not solve the problem. Blue and white light work together to cause interferences with your brain that can directly affect your well-being during the day, and your sleep at night.

Here are some tips to live by:

Blue Light

Download a “Blue Light” app or extension on your phone, computer, and tablet to reduce eye fatigue and strain; Search “blue light” in either your Google Play or Apple store to find results. But not all apps are equal- try them out and see what gives you the most positive results. I love “BlueLight Filter” from Android and “Screen Shader” for your Chromebook or computer.

After downloading, you can click the icon on your toolbar and either mask a day or nightshade depending on the time of day. The screen will turn a different color with a mask of pink/salmon (or other colors of your choice). If you take a screenshot, your screenshot will also have the colored mask for some apps. You can also temporarily turn off the shade function for zero interference- I do this easily on “Screen Shader” with just one click.

Body Mechanics

  • Position keyboard directly in front of your body.
  • Adjust keyboard and height, so shoulders are relaxed, and elbows are slightly open.
  • Keep neck and jaw in a neutral and relaxed position.
  • Adjust the screen rather than adjusting your neck as you work.
  • Look away from your screen periodically and get up and move!
  • Push your body to the back part of your chair and adjust the height of the chair (if applicable).
  • Aim to be one arm’s length away from your screen.
  • Stretch and flex hands, fingers, and wrists throughout the day.

Go Outside

Take a walk and spend more time outside. A quick 15-minute walk can do wonders for your health paired with the joy that sunlight can bring to your brain. Getting proper daylight during the day also helps you sleep better at night. If the weather hinders you from being outside, keep the blinds open if you have windows.

Sleep

We continue to work harder and sleep less, which equates to feeling run down and making more mistakes throughout the work and school day. Do your best to put devices away 90 minutes before bed time. If you cannot do this, use one of the “Blue Light” extensions during your time on the device to limit interference with circadian sleep rhythms.

 

During the past few weeks of staying true to these tips, I have noticed gains in my posture, sleep patterns, and overall well-being during the day. I encourage you to practice self-care and to give a few of these tips a try as well. Once you try it and see results- teach your students, colleagues, and beyond! Although we love technology, we have to train ourselves to love our bodies and health even more!

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Build a Collaborative Culture by Asking for Help

The title of this post is incredibly misleading; There is much more that goes into building a collaborative culture than simply asking for help. But, I must admit that asking for help is a meaningful start. Although I strive to serve others in all I do, I also have come to understand that we must be willing to ask for help first before others feel comfortable reaching out to us.

Many of us hear metaphors that include:

– Life is a “give and take.”
– “You give before you get.”
– “You must sow the seed before you reap the harvest.”

Although these sayings have meaningful intentions, after years of hearing “always give first,” you begin to feel guilty when asking for even the tiniest assistance. Furthermore, sometimes we even feel weak or inferior if we ask for help; As if one person can somehow know all of the answers to life. We cannot do it alone; We need each other.

I have found that by asking others for genuine guidance, you start to heighten the comfort level between you and your peers. Giving to others can include providing others with resources, suggestions, time, effort, and your heart. It can even be established by asking a question to gather feedback, like, “What would you do in this circumstance?” or “I see that you are really successful with _________, do you have any tips that you could share?”

By asking for help, you can also show interest in another person. In addition, you can build a culture where people conclude that “If he/she feels comfortable asking for help, I am going to feel at ease asking him/her for help next time.”

Everyone deserves to feel heard and it all begins with us.

It may sound over-sentimental, but try asking a colleague a question that you may not usually talk to, or pick their brain for essential insight that could improve your teaching practice. You will be astonished to see how new friendships can build and how your school culture may launch to the next level with the beginnings of one small act.

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What Really Matters


This post will be a bit different than others I have posted in the past. I hope by unveiling more levels of who I am and how my thought processes evolve over time, I can connect with you, my friends and readers, even further. 


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Image Credit: Kara Welty

Today, I went to church for the first time in several months. Living in a new city has tested my courage. Truth be told, I have been eager, yet exceptionally nervous to find a new church community that I will belong in.

It can be nerve-wracking to display your heart to a group of individuals who you do not know, in particular on a personal level. But, through these moments, I need to remind myself that you see your strength and the strength of others in these moments of vulnerability.

Ironically enough, the message at church today ended up solidifying my feelings of vulnerability and reminded me about what REALLY matters. Below are themes from today’s mass that can apply to many facets of life. I hope this enlightens you, as it did for me:

Grit, tenacity, and hard work are valuable, but they are not everything.

We are trained to work hard and to pave the life we want to live. But, somehow we omit to take the pressure off ourselves to know all of life’s solutions. Furthermore, we get too accustomed in being in the driver’s seat. Sometimes, by “being in control” we can unintentionally push ourselves to levels of exhaustion. When we do this, we may be missing the point of what our journeys are all about.

Have faith in your life’s path and trust that opportunities will present themselves to you when you are ready; Letting go of that steering wheel can be a cathartic process.

Gladness is the opposite of loneliness.

Happiness can be temporary and fleeting. We often jump to the next thing or event that can bring us joy, but then once that anticipated moment comes, we feel empty again; It is a continuous cycle unless we break it. Seeking to be content is harder than it seems when life rises and falls in unexpected directions. But, what if we found gladness in the right, rather than the wrong ways? What if we praised moments where we were tested and tried? What if we sought gladness when we needed God as our refuge?

Do not get transfixed in the journeys of others.

We are all humans doing the best we can. We often see others who we think “have it all” and view them as superhuman. Admiring the traits of others is a beautiful thing; But, we cannot forget that those individuals are human, too. Everyone has a journey, and ALL routes include stumbles and falls, whether we see those pitfalls or not. Do everything you can to refrain from idolizing others.  Be grateful for the journey God gave you. Take solace in what you bring to the table to serve the world.

 

Live life with purpose; Be who you were called to be.

Happy Sunday,

Kara Welty

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My Weekly “Resume of Failures”

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Image Credit- lifehack.org


This weekend I attended the GAFE Summit in Kansas City. I was fortunate enough to hear James Sanders, co-founder of Breakout EDU, speak during the keynote. During his talk, he mentioned his personal “Resume of Failures.” Although most of us have seen the article referring to the Princeton professor publishing his career lows, I was even more moved to see an educator I admire display bravery and vulnerability in such a public setting. Therefore, thank you, James, for inadvertently inspiring me to publish this post:

To begin with, the word “failure” has always been an idea that stirs me to my core.

Here are some questions I often ponder: We fail every single day, so why is it unusual if someone publicly admits their failures? Does admitting that we are not perfect make us “less than” someone who we believe is doing everything right?

No one is perfect and we know this. But, I often believe that our personal perceptions can be our worst enemies. Sometimes failure does not push us down, while other times it can. It is often difficult to admit to ourselves the dark places of our failures. I find this to be especially true when we are tenacious to a fault. We can try to train our brain all day long to think we love failing, but if we are actually struggling sometimes during the process, are we doing an injustice to our learning journey if we cannot be genuine, open, and honest?

Even though I fail every single day (or several times a day, if I want to be REALLY honest), I am going to start giving myself the grace to feel uncomfortable when I do not live up to my perfectionist standards.

I know I will grow during the journey, stay positive, push through, and become better as a result, but in the moment, it is okay if failing does not feel great. What I am finding out, is that what matters is my patience through it all.

So, on that note, let us start getting comfortable with the uncomfortable.

Therefore, to end this post, I am going to leave you with a list of ways I have failed this week:

My Weekly “Resume of Failures”:

  • I did not charge my presentation pointer and clicker, so during my presentation today, I had to click the trackpad the old-fashioned way to get to the next slides (There is a first time for everything!).
  • I ate a ridiculous amount of BBQ over the weekend and blamed it on the fact that I am in Kansas City, even though I live here now.
  • I did not do any laundry over the weekend and am now staring at a huge pile of clothes.
  • I did not work-out this week, not even once.
  • I have had an unusual creative block on an upcoming presentation I will be leading.
  • I skipped my dental exam because I was too focused on work (Don’t worry, I eventually rescheduled it!).
  • I tried an activity with students that I thought would be a blast, did it ended up not living up to my imagined standards.
  • I spent too much time beating myself over the mistakes I made above (and most certainly more that I forgot about) instead of just being me.

Although I tend to think about my mistakes at unhealthy levels, I know that by writing this I can help someone else who feels the same way. I hope that through my openness and discomfort with this, that I can encourage you to own the uncomfortable journey that comes along with failing as well. Let’s start giving ourselves the unwavering love that we give our students- We deserve that grace, too.


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How Do You Define Leadership?

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If you take a step back within the walls of your school, who is making the majority of the decisions?

Through connecting with other educators around the world, I often hear the stories of others in the world of leadership. When many answer the question above, the first answer I hear is usually “administrators and superintendents.” Others sometimes say “teacher leaders.” I rarely hear this response: “students.”

There are many schools around the globe that who are guiding authentic student voice for the decisions they make. But beyond this, I do believe that we have an underlying issue with how we define leadership.

Leadership is NOT:

-The role you have

-An age

-The years of experience you have in your position

-How many people are “below you” in your position

-A fancy name plate

If we look into how our schools are often run, we still have this traditional definition of what leadership is, and it defines everything we do.

In many cases, to become a school leader you need to meet a prerequisite of years even to be considered for a school administration experience. Although experience is important, why don’t we look at people for who they as individuals and what they bring to the table rather than following a set of parameters established before them?

When guidelines set everything we follow, it makes sense why teachers who speak to me from around the nation feel that they need to earn their leadership, even as a teacher.

If we have this mentality for our adults, chances are this can also be reflected in the way we treat students.

Do students walk into your school as leaders, or do they have to earn it? Leadership should not be viewed as a privilege for the few; it should be a right for us all.

As Todd Whitaker says, “The school should be changing more to fit the new teacher, not the other way around.”

We often expect kids, young teachers, and parents to adapt to us, rather than us learning from THEM.

Ralph Nader says, “The function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.” I would like to challenge this; I believe that everyone is a leader, it is not something that we “produce.” If we do not see our own people as leaders, chances are we do not know their strengths. But, we can change this to create environments that help kids and teachers believe they matter.

How we define leadership is crucial. What does leadership mean to you and your kids?

Kara Welty

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Are We Spoon Feeding or Empowering?

Image Credit

As educators, we all start our journey because we love kids and want to help them.

What is interesting, though, is that over time, we learn strategies and develop unconscious habits to “help” students, when in reality we are unconsciously enabling students rather than empowering. Sometimes over helping even becomes instinctual. But even with the best intentions, our over “help” can often resemble spoon feeding.

Empowering students has always been a passion of mine. I am always engrossed in finding ways to stretch brains and mindsets, including my own, in new and different directions. This past week, the phenomenal 4th-grade teachers at my school, @clarkesclass @teammontgomery @msrittsclass, and I have been working on approaches to help students in this area and we have been brainstorming ideas to challenge thinking.

Therefore, this week I worked with 4th graders on a Digital Scavenger Hunt I created that closely resembles a Digital Breakout Edu format. Yet in my scavenger hunt; students had to think critically to think outside of the box, troubleshoot, and to create and solve technical problems they have never encountered before. Each step built on the action before it, and it required deep thinking and trial-and-error to reach the destination. Just like many Breakout Boxes do, I gave each student the ability to use two tips to ask for help along the way.

During this Digital Scavenger Hunts with the classes, numerous students were astonishingly focused on the tasks and determined to reach the destination at all costs! But, there were also many who looked at step 1 and immediately said: “This is too hard, I give up,” or “I quit.” This also occurred once students ran out of tips. Even though it was hard for us to not over help at times; When these moments occurred, it was the perfect opportunities to discuss with students the idea of “YET” and growth mindset. In other words, it is okay to be honest about frustrations when challenges arise, but we have to work hard to train our brains to think: “I may not get it YET, but I will if I keep trying and am patient.” We also discussed the idea of progress; We may not reach our desired destination now, but if we make growth, we should be proud of each stride we made.

Although discussing growth mindset and learning how our brains work helps jump start crucial conversations, what we often miss is to truly challenge students and to help them apply what they learned about growth mindset in real-life scenarios.

Some students revealed to us after the Digital Scavenger Hunt that they wanted to give up many times during this challenge because it was too hard, but they started thinking positive and then realized “Hey, I can do this!” When you empower students to lead with a growth mindset, once they do overcome challenges, their reactions are priceless. There is nothing that can replace a student proud of his or her accomplishments from exerting true grit.

The 4th-grade teachers and I are currently planning mini-challenges that we will embed throughout the school year called Mindset ManiaThank you, @clarkesclass for the clever wording! These challenges will include anything from STEM to collaborative projects and they are designed to positively develop growth and innovators mindsets. I am looking forward to watching students grow as we embed thought processes like this into everything we do.

After all, nothing is sweeter than seeing a student proud of his or her accomplishments while endlessly persevering and learning new ideas along the way. If we aim to empower students today, the impact will last a lifetime.

Growth Mindset
This picture from today displays the joy that occurs when students reach their goals and realize “I CAN do this!”
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